Friday, April 9, 2021

Leaf Sampler - Part 3, Fishbone stitch

The third little leaf of my leaf sampler is ready and after having played with the 'How to', I stitched put them all together on a little tree, but more about that at the end of this post.


~ ~ ~ Basic Fishbone Stitch ~ ~ ~ 

This last leaf is stitched using Fishbone Stitch. Unlike the previous two, Fly Stitch and Cretan Stitch, Fishbone stitch doesn't make a strongly defined center vein. It looks more like satin stitch but slightly raised or embossed down the middle because the stitches overlap.

As with Cretan Stitch, Fishbone stitch is usually illustrated worked over four parallel lines and forms a decorative but not very leaf-looking filling.


1) Bring the thread to the front at A on one of the middle lines. 
Take the needle to the back at B, on the outline furthest away from A. (The thread should cross the        other middle line for the stitch to work).
Emerge at C on the opposite outline. A long stitch will from across the full width of the shape on the     wrong side.
2) Take the needle to the back at D on the middle line furthest away from C, crossing over the first stitch.
Emerge at E on the other middle line, directly below A.
3) The first stitch forms kind of an uneven cross.


4)
Repeat step 1: Take the needle to the back at F, on the outline directly below B. Make sure the spacing is the same as A-E in step 2.
Emerge at G, on the opposite outline, directly below C and parallel with F.
5) Repeat step 2: Matching the spacing of the stitches, take the needle to the back at H, crossing to the middle line directly below D.
Emerge at I on the other middle line, directly below E. 
6) Continue to repeat these steps down the shape, keeping the stitches evenly spaced.

Closed fishbone stitch 
7) When you place the stitches close together, fishbone stitch will cover the shape. 

HINT Remember when you stitch in a hoop, the needle should be taken through the fabric in a stabbing motion, not in and out in one go as in the pictures - I only do that to make it more clear how the points relate to one another.


~ ~ ~ Fishbone Stitch Leaf ~ ~ ~


When using fishbone stitch to fill a leaf, I don't mark double lines for the center vein. Instead, I place the stitches down the center, crossing under the marked line. This also makes it easier to use the stitch if you are following a pattern as most designs only have the single center line marked.



1) Start with a straight stitch at the tip. I prefer to stitch from the tip (A) of the leaf to the top of the center vein (B).
Bring the thread to the front at C, on the outline and closely against the center stitch.
Crossing the center stitch, take the needle to the back at D and emerge at E. D and E are level with B.
2) Crossing the center stitch, take the needle to the back at F on the opposite outline closely against the middle stitch.
3) Continue down the leaf, taking the needle from outline to outline at the top and under the center line down the middle. 



4) Make sure you keep the stitches close together to cover the shape. I find that to maintain the stitch direction, I place the stitches closer together on the outline and ever so slightly spaced down the middle.
5) Depending on shape of your leaf and the angle of your stitches, you may need one or two straight stitches at the bottom to finish it nicely. 


I did try to fill my leaf with an open Fishbone stitch (right). I am not so sure about that version, but it would make a lovely pinecone if it was stitched in brown.


The difference between the three leaf stitches is subtle, but enough to add a bit of variation. What I like about all three is that they are so easily interchanged, so I drew up another little tree, one with more leaves than the previous.


It is only small and even though it is 'just a sampler' I thought I would put it to some use. 
I have a small magnifying lamp. I rarely use the magnifier but the led light is good especially when I take photos while I work.

I am always worried that I will leave it in a spot where the magnifier will get light through it and cause a fire (it happens - so be careful where you leave your lamps or make sure you cover them).


With that in mind, I decided the little tree would make a pretty magnifier cover so rummaged through my stash and found a nice cotton print to match for the back.
I made a (very quick and very rough) template for the shape by just drawing halfway around the magnifier and then cut both pieces to make a sleeve/pocket.
After sewing the pieces together, I folded the hem in to make a channel for elastic. Only to discover I am out of elastic..! For now it has a drawstring to stop the pocket sleeve from slipping off. 


I hope you are all keeping well, and if you are in the northern hemisphere that spring is starting to brighten your days. We are heading into autumn in Adelaide and the late summer weather has been spectacular. Even so, it doesn't matter how long I have lived in Australia, I will never get used to not having spring bulbs starting to flower in the garden over Easter. 


While I write this, Adrian has been getting the truck ready and we are heading off on another road trip for a break. We did have plans, then they changed and they may well change again. That is what I like about road trips - you never quite know where they lead you. One thing is sure; we will be heading bush so there will have no internet (distractions) for at least a few days. 

Take care of your selves and each other. 
Stay safe & Keep on stitching.
Hugs,
Anna X

3 comments:

  1. It is so much fun trying the stitches you demonstrate. Nice idea, too, about embroidering the lamp cover. Happy travels and stitching! :-)

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  2. Thank you for another perfect tutorial, Anna! Now I'm thinking I need a teddy bear with a little dress covered in embroidered leaves.

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